Planting a Bradford Pear Verses a Real Fruit Tree
05 Aug
Planting a Bradford Pear Vs a Real Fruit Tree

We begin by talking about the Bradford Pear and why it is not a good choice for your property. Many people like the Bradford Pear for one main reason…the gorgeous white flower it produces in the Spring time.  But beyond that, it has a number faults, including its pungent smell.

Unfortunately, Bradford Pears Actually Cross Pollinate

The Bradford Pear Tree originated in Korea and China and was, in 1964, introduced by the US Department of Agriculture as a sterile ornamental tree. But Bradford Pears are not infertile as it was presumed. Though they don’t pollinate among other Bradford Pears trees, they do pollinate with many other trees. Because of this problem of cross-pollination, the descendants of these pear trees have now spread far and wide. And the new generation of trees has regressed to the ancient Chinese Callery pears which form impassable prickly underbrush that choke the life out of the other trees in the forest.

They Grow Too Large and Are Structurally Weak

These trees were supposed to be modest ornamental trees that grow to around 25 feet tall and wide. Unfortunately, these trees occasionally grow twice as large and take over the small yard space in which they are planted.  Additionally, these trees are structurally weak.  Often snow,   rain, or wind can cause these trees to snap in half. Their lifespan is about 20 years, often dying from being broken into by the weather.


What To Do If You Have A Bradford Pear Tree in Your Yard – Cut It Down

Fall is a optimal time to plant new trees, so now is a good time to cut down any Bradford Pear trees on your property to get ready for your new tree(s).

Here’s What To Do

  1. Call Northside Tree Professionals at (770) 394-0905 to cut down your Bradford Pear tree and grind its stump. Afterwards, you should mow or weed-eat  often around the area so that any sprouts won’t grow to large and begin to produce seeds.
  2. Replace the Bradford Pear tree with any one of a number of other fruit tree (suggestions below).

Alternatives To The Bradford Pear Tree

Thankfully, these are many better alternatives that you can plant on your property. Choose alternatives based on your needs:

If you are not looking for a tree that actually produces food, here are a number of other option.

Source: https://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheet/bradford-pear/


If you have any questions about the trees you want to plant, please call Northside Tree Professionals at 770-394-0905.